Still down

Hi everyone, sorry for my lack of writing lately. Computer’s still down and it looks like it’ll be another week before I’ll be back. I’ve finished all of the books that I had on my TBR list last Friday (amazing!), and now I’m looking for books to read in September. If anyone has any suggestions, or you have a book you want reviewed, send me an email or a comment!

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REVIEW: Ascension by Caris Roane

Title/Author: Ascension by Caris Roane

Genre: Paranormal Romance

ISBN:978-0312533717

Buy it link: http://www.amazon.com/Ascension-Guardians-Caris-Roane/dp/0312533713/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1346253045&sr=8-1&keywords=ascension+by+caris+roane

Rating: 4 stars

Goodreads synopsis:

Alison Wells is no ordinary woman. Born with supernatural powers, she can never make love to a man without putting him in grave danger. But when her special vision reveals a glorious muscled man soaring overhead on mighty wings, she feels an overwhelming attraction she cannot resist—even as he tells her: “I have come for you. Your blood belongs to me.”

Oh boy…I’m a huge fan of paranormal romance, and this book is excellent! I was leary of starting this series but I’ve heard so many good things about it from other people. I am so glas I started this series. The author does such a good job of explaining the world and dimensions there wasn’t a single question in my mind. I couldn’t find holes in them, and the storyline didn’t leave time to question anything. The romance was hot, the action was fast-paced. I can’t wait to start the second one!

REVIEW: The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

Title/Author: The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

ISBN:978-0446605236

Buy it link

Rating: 3 1/2 stars

A man with a faded, well-worn notebook open in his lap. A woman experiencing a morning ritual she doesn’t understand. Until he begins to read to her. The Notebook is an achingly tender story about the enduring power of love, a story of miracles that will stay with you forever. Set amid the austere beauty of coastal North Carolina in 1946, The Notebook begins with the story of Noah Calhoun, a rural Southerner returned home from World War II. Noah, thirty-one, is restoring a plantation home to its former glory, and he is haunted by images of the beautiful girl he met fourteen years earlier, a girl he loved like no other. Unable to find her, yet unwilling to forget the summer they spent together, Noah is content to live with only memories… until she unexpectedly returns to his town to see him once again. Allie Nelson, twenty-nine, is now engaged to another man, but realizes that the original passion she felt for Noah has not dimmed with the passage of time. Still, the obstacles that once ended their previous relationship remain, and the gulf between their worlds is too vast to ignore. With her impending marriage only weeks away, Allie is forced to confront her hopes and dreams for the future, a future that only she can shape. Like a puzzle within a puzzle, the story of Noah and Allie is just beginning. As it unfolds, their tale miraculously becomes something different, with much higher stakes. The result is a deeply moving portrait of love itself, the tender moments, and fundamental changes that affect us all. Shining with a beauty that is rarely found in current literature, The Notebook establishes Nicholas Sparks as a classic storyteller with a unique insight into the only emotion that really matters.

I found this to be a very sweet and tender romance story. I think this was the only Nicholas Sparks book that I haven’t cried at, but I was close a few times. It’s so good to read about a romance that can continue and grow stronger throguh the years. Even through the bad times, even when it breaks his heart, Noah continues to love Allie and stay by her side, day by day and night by night.

Downtime

Sorry to all of my followers. My computer’s kaput at home right now, going to the shop tomorrow. I hope to be back up and running on Thursday or Friday.

I’m not ignoring you, just can’t get to you! 🙂

 

Feature and Follow #1

So I found this through Kim at Snuggle My Books. It’s Feature and Follow.

And the question this week is:  Worst cover? What is the worst cover of a book that you’ve read and loved?

At first I couldn’t answer this question, but the old classic book A Wrinkle in Time has been on my mind alot lately (probably because I read Ender’s Game). Its been around for so long, that the cover has changed several times, so I’m just going to pick the most hideous of them.

Apparently this is one of the original covers to the book, which was first published in 1962 ( a full 15 years before I was born!).

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REVIEW: Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

Title and Author: Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

Genre: Science Fiction/ YA

ISBN: 978-0812550702

Amazon link/BN.com link/Google Books

Rating: 4 1/2 stars

Quick synopsis from Goodreads: In order to develop a secure defense against a hostile alien race’s next attack, government agencies breed child geniuses and train them as soldiers. A brilliant young boy, Andrew “Ender” Wiggin lives with his kind but distant parents, his sadistic brother Peter, and the person he loves more than anyone else, his sister Valentine. Peter and Valentine were candidates for the soldier-training program but didn’t make the cut—young Ender is the Wiggin drafted to the orbiting Battle School for rigorous military training.

I’ve seen this book many times in the bookshops I’ve frequented through the years, and have picked it up once or twice to buy it, always putting it back down. I’m glad that I’ve finally read it. This is a classic book that should be a must-read for everyone, along with Madeliene L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.

This book is amazing, and heartbreaking. In the beginning, Ender is six years old. I have a 6 year old and I watched her as I read it. I couldn’t imagine putting my 6 year old through some of that book. On the other hand, Ender is so far advanced, at such a genius level, so beyond the word “gifted”, that its easy to believe you’re reading about a much older child or teen. The way the adults in the book manipulate the children is cruel and heartless…understandable given the situation, but heartless and cruel noetheless.

I enjoyed reading about Ender, and how he kept his humanity throughout the book, instead of becoming callous and unfeeling. The end had me in tears and wanting to read the next book immediately, Speaker for the Dead.

Friday Finds

ImageFRIDAY FINDS showcases the books you ‘found’ and added to your To Be Read (TBR) list… whether you found them online, or in a bookstore, or in the library — wherever! (they aren’t necessarily books you purchased).

This week, I’m happy to say that I finished last week’s TBR pile, and reviewed them all, as well as finally finished Ender’s Game last night. I’m planning on geting a review up for that this weekend. So now, this week, I plan on the following of my massive TBR pile:

1. Ascension by Caris Roane

2. The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

3. Divergent by Veronica Roth